Tuesday, 19 June 2012

White Knowledge of the Vedas; Aryans, Dravidians, and Racial Referencesin the Vedas

The Aryans, Dravidians,  and Racial References in the Vedas
by Nikarev Leshy

Ancient legend has it that many millenia ago, from beyond the northern high mountains of the Himalayas, beyond the Khyber Pass, and far beyond the mountains of the Pāriyātra Parvata, that seven Aryan teachers, known as ṛṣi, the saptarṣi, descended from the Russian steppe and brought with them to northern India the Sanskrit language and sacred knowledge. This numinous Aryan wisdom  was later compiled into the sacred texts which we have today, known as the Vedas. This knowledge, which the white teachers brought with them, laid the foundations for what is known today as Hinduism, Brahmanism, and Buddhism. This ancient knowledge is the pillar of these pantheistic spiritualisms.

According to the Rigveda, the leader of the Aryan invasion was one Indra, and his role in ‘slaying the Dasyus’ (the Negroids in India, the Dravidians) is prominent:

"Thou, Indra, art the destroyer of all the cities, the slayer of the Dasyus, the prosperer of man, the lord of the sky."
- Rigveda, Book 8, Indra 87.6 (8.LXXXVII.6) [ Muir I.175 ]

"Indra, the slayer of Vrittra, the destroyer of cities, has scattered the Dasyu (hosts) sprang from a black womb." *

- Rigveda, Book 2, Indra 20.6 (2.XX.7) [ Muir I.174 ] 

He also took care of preserving his white children:

He was praised for destroying “the Dasyans and protected the Aryan colour."
- Rigveda, Book 2, Indra 34.9 (III.34.9) [ Anna. 114 ] 

"the thunderer who bestowed on his white friends the fields, bestowed the sun, bestowed the waters." **
- Rigveda, Book 1, Indra 100.18 (I.C.18) [ Anna. 114 ]

"Indra protected in battle the Aryan worshipper, he subdued the lawless for Manu, he conquered the black skin." ***
- Rigveda, Book 1, Indra 130.8 (I.CXXX.8) [ Anna.114 ]


The Aryans viewed the black skin (Krishnam Vacham [Sanskrit]), Dravidians, distastefully and with abhorrence:

"Black skin is impious" (Dasam varnam adharam [Sanskrit]) ****
- Rigveda, Book 2, Indra 12.4 (2.XXII.4) [ Muir Pt.I, p.43, II, p.284, 323 etc. ] [ Anna. 114 ff ]

“the swarthy skin which Indra hates.”
- Rigveda, Book 9, Soma Pavamana 73.5 (9.LXXIII.5) [ Griff ]


“the black skin, the hated of Indra"
- Rigveda, Book 9,
Soma Pavamana  [ RgV.IX.73.5 ] - don't know the translation Kemp is using as it is above by Griffith. Kemp page 65

"the vile Dasyan colour." *****
-
Rigveda, Book 2,  Indra 20.7, 12.4 (2.XX.7, 2.XII.4) [ Anna. 115 ]







See also, [ RgV. IX.41.1, Sam.V. I.491 (49.1????????), II.242 ] [ Anna. 114 ]

The Aryans were referred to as driving the Dravidians away:

"He, self-reliant, mighty and triumphant, brought low the dear head of the wicked Dāsa." 
- Rigveda, Book 2, Indra 20.6 (2.XX.6) [ Griff: book 2, hymn XX Indra, 6 ]

"Active and bright have they come forth, impetuous in speed like bulls, driving the black skin far away."
Soma Pavamana - 9.41.1

The sacrificer poured out thanks to his god for "scattering the slave bands of black descent", and for stamping out "the vile Dasyan colour."
[ Rg.V. II.20.7, II.12.4 ] [ Anna. 115 ] 

"O'er Sire and Mother they have roared in unison bright with the verse of praise, burning up riteless men, Blowing away with supernatural might from earth and from the heavens the swarthy skin which Indra hates."
Soma Pavamana - 9.73.5

"stormy gods who rush on like furious bulls and scatter the black skin."“the black skin, the hated of Indra" will be swept out of heaven.
[ RgV.IX.73.5 ]

"Indra protected in battle the Aryan worshipper, he subdued the lawless for Manu, he conquered the black skin." [ Rg.V. I.130.8 ] [ Anna.114 ] as below?

"Indra in battles help his Aryan worshipper, he who hath hundred helps at hand in every fray, in frays that win the light of heaven. Plaguing the lawless he gave up to Manu's seed the dusky skin; Blazing, 'twere, he burns each covetous man away, he burns, the tyrannous away."

"[Indra] made the impious varNa of the dAsas lower and hidden."
[ RV. II.12.4 ] 

"Thou to the son of Vidathin, Rjisvan, gavest up mighty Mrgaya and Pipru. Thou smotest down the swarthy fifty thousand, and rentest forts as age consumes a garment."
Indra - 4.16.13

"One car-wheel of the Sun thou rolledst forward, and one thou settest free to move for Kutsa. Thou slewest noseless Dasyus with thy weapon, and in their home o'erthrewest hostile speakers." ("Noseless Dasyus" would suggest a reference to flat nosed Negroid types)
Indra - 5.29.10

" Thou, a hero, a benefactor, hast impelled the character of man; victorious, thou hast burnt up the rite-less Dasyu, as a vessel is consumed by a blaze”
[ RgV. I.175.3 ] [ Muir I.174 ]

" Ye mighty ones [ Asvins ] what do you do there; why do you stay there among the people who are held in high esteem through not offering sacrifices; ignore them, destroy the life of the Panis "
[ RgV I.83.3 ] [ S+T.365 ]

"He, much invoked, hath slain Dasyus and Simyus, after his wont, and laid them low with arrows. The mighty Thunderer with his fair-complexioned friends won the land, the sunlight, and the waters."
Indra - 1.100.18

"Sing, with oblation, praise to him who maketh glad, who with Rjisvan drove the dusky brood away. Fain for help, him the strong whose right hand wields the bolt, him girt by Maruts we invoke to be our Friend."
Indra - 1.101.1

"Armed with his bolt and trusting in his prowess he wandered shattering the forts of Dasas. Cast thy dart, knowing, Thunderer, at the Dasyu; increase the Arya's might and glory, Indra."
Indra - 1.103.3

“For him who thus hath taught these human races, Maghavan, bearing a fame-worthy title, Thunderer, drawing nigh to slay the Dasyus, hath given himself the name of Son for glory."
Indra - 1.103.4

Rig Veda references to the Aryans as being blondes

"With him too is this rain of his that comes like herds: Indra throws drops of moisture on his yellow beard. When the sweet juice is shed he seeks the pleasant place, and stirs the worshipper as wind disturbs the wood."
Indra - 10.23.4

"At the swift draught the Soma-drinker waxed in might, the Iron One with yellow beard and yellow hair. He, Lord of Tawny Coursers, Lord of fleet-foot Mares, will bear his Bay Steeds safely over all distress."

Indra - 10.96.8

"O Lord of all men, fair of cheek, rejoice thee in the gladdening lauds, Present at these drink-offerings."
Indra - 1.9.3

"He, much invoked, hath slain Dasyus and Simyus, after his wont, and laid them low with arrows. The mighty Thunderer with his fair-complexioned friends won the land, the sunlight, and the waters."
Indra - 1.100.18

"Sing, with oblation, praise to him who maketh glad, who with Rjisvan drove the dusky brood away. Fain for help, him the strong whose right hand wields the bolt, him girt by Maruts we invoke to be our Friend."
Indra - 1.101.1


NOTES

* Muir referenced as 20.6 in Hinduism: What Really Happened in India by Prof. Dr. Madathilparampil Mammen Ninan, page 43, The Bible of Aryan Invasions by Prof. Uthaya Naidu, and Awakening: The Rise of Western Civilization, page 65 (vol. 1 of March of the Titans) by Arthur Kemp B.A. (Pol. Sci., Intl. Pol., Pub. Admin). These three works use the Muir translation as "who dwelt in the darkness". 20.6 is translated by Griffith as "brought low the dear head of the wicked Dāsa." - Rigveda, Book 2, Indra 20.6 (II.20.6) [ Griff ]. However, 20.7 as translated by Griffith reads "Indra the Vṛtra-slayer, Fort-destroyer, scattered the Dāsa hosts who dwelt in darkness." - Rigveda, Book 2, Indra 20.7 (II.20.7) [ Griff ]. The correct reference appears to be 20.7 going by the Griffith translation which is the one that I can verify but that line refers to those "who dwelt in the darkness". The 20.6 references seems only to be associated with Muir and translates as "sprang from a black womb" but other than the above books I do not have access as yet to the Muir work. It 'appears' that all online references to 20.6 [ Muir ] should actually be 20.7, even though Griffith translates it differently. I do not have the Muir publication to cross reference so it may either be a typographical error or that it is actually shown in the Muir work as 20.6, and he translates it as "sprang from a black womb. Regardless, their are plenty of other references to the 'black skin' of the Dasyus in the easily accessible Griffith translation.

** "The mighty Thunderer with his fair-complexioned friends won the land, the sunlight, and the waters."
- Rigveda, Book 1, Indra 100.18 (I.C.18) [ Griff ]

*** "Indra in battles help his Aryan worshipper, he who hath hundred helps at hand in every fray, in frays that win the light of heaven. Plaguing the lawless he gave up to Manu's seed the dusky skin"
- Rigveda, Book 1, Indra 130.8 (I.CXXX.8) [ Griff ]


**** "By whom this universe was made to tremble, who chased away the humbled brood of demons,
Who, like a gambler gathering his winnings seized the foe's riches, He, O men, is Indra" 
- Rigveda, Book 2, Indra 12.4 (2.XII.4) [ Griff ]

***** Griffith reads "scattered the Dāsa hosts who dwelt in darkness." - Rigveda, Book 2,  Indra 20.7 (2.XX.7) [See note * regarding "dewelt in darkness] and "By whom this universe was made to tremble, who chased away the humbled brood of demons, Who, like a gambler gathering his winnings seized the foe's riches, He, O men, is Indra" - Rigveda, Book 2, Indra 12.4 (2.XII.4)

 
REFERENCES

* ‘Vedic Origin of Racism’, Sanjay Jain, Dalitstan Journal, Volume 2, Issue 6 (Dec. 2000) who used the below sources:

* [ Griff ] – ‘The Rig Veda’, translated by Ralph T.H. Griffith, 1890/6?? E.J. Lazarus and Company, 1890, 2 volumes.

* [ Anna. ] - `The Annals of Rural Bengal', Sir William Wilson Hunter, Broomhill House, 1868,
Smith, Elder, and Co. 1868. reprinted in `Landmarks of Indian Anthropology', vol.7, Cosmo Publications, New Delhi, 1987.

* [ Lead ] - `Are the Brahmins Leaders of Hindu Religion?', Dr. M. Deivanayagam Dr. D. Devakala; published by The Revival Movement of Dravidian Religion 1998, http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Ithaca/1412/brahmins.html

* [ Muir ] - `Original Sanskrit Texts on the Origin and History of the People of India', John Muir report Oriental Publishers Delhi 1972 part I Mythical and Legendary Accounts of the Origin of Caste.

* [ Raci ] - `Racism', Dr. M. Deivanayagam, Dr. D. Devakala; published by The Revival Movement of Dravidian Religion 1998, http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Ithaca/1412/racism.html

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